Rev. FINN, Daniel SJ
范達賢神父 (芬戴禮)

* Birth in Ireland (愛爾蘭): [24 March 1886]
* Enter Novitiate: [6 September 1902]
* Ordination in Ireland: [24 February 1919]
* Arrival in Hong Kong (香港): [1926]
* Death in London (倫敦), U.K. (英國): [1 November1936]

# Information according to “Jesuits in Hong Kong, South China and Beyond” / Pictorial memories of the Jesuits in Hong Kong 1926 to 2016


Father Daniel Finn, S.J.
(1886-1936)

The news of Father Finns death came as a shock to all who knew him even by name, and it was a painful blow to those who knew him personally. He was one of those rare characters that are equally conspicuous for qualities of heart and of head, and among all who came in contact with him his genial disposition will be as well remembered as his brilliant intellect. His death is a loss to science and especially to Hong Kong, and it is particularly tragic that he should have died abroad while on a scientific mission, representing both the Government and the University of Hong Kong.

It is close on forty years since I first met Father Finn, and I can still remember the first occasion on which I heard his name. It was at the first distribution of prizes which I attended at school. As a new boy and a very diminutive member of the lowest class, I listened with awe to the Headmasters account of the successes of the year, and I can recall his attitude and the tone of his voice as he told how one Daniel Finn found himself in a very enviable dilemma after his first public examination - he had to choose which of two gold medals he would accept. He had qualified for two, one for being first in Ireland in whole examination, and the other for being first in modern languages, but even in those amazing nineties when gold medals were awarded so liberally, no student in this examination could receive more than one. I forget which he chose, but I remember that the Headmaster fully approved of it - as headmasters always do on such occasions.

It was not long before the “Daniel” of the Headmaster’s speech gave place to “Dan.” Three years is a considerable gap between school-boy ages and to me Dan Finn was one of the Olympians, but he was a very cheerful divinity and was as much a hero to the smaller boys as if he were a proud athlete who never passed an examination. He never changed much in appearance from what he was as a boy. He was of the same build then as later, short and sturdy, with the same quizzical look about his eyes, and the same pucker of the lips, and the same odd angle of the head when he was hesitating about something. He grew careless about his clothes as the years went on, but as a boy in Cork forty years ago he was neatness itself, and the wide white collar above the Norfolk coat of those days was always spotless. He took no active part in games, but his best friend was a prominent athlete, and at school football-matches he was constantly to be seen on the touchline, leaning on the shoulder of some companion, and talking incessantly.

He had many family sorrows during his school-days, but they left no scars, and his good-humoured disposition never varied. His success in studies was phenomenal. It was commonly said of him in our school-days that he got first in every examination for which he sat. I am sure that this was an exaggeration, but it cannot have been very far from the truth. He was the only boy I remember whose photograph was hung in the school immediately after he left it. It was put over the fireplace in my classroom, and as we sat around the fire before class or during recess, remarks were often made about him.

“Where is he now?” someone asked one day.

“He is gone to be a Jesuit,” someone else answered.

That was the first time that I heard of anyone I knew becoming a Jesuit.

After a few years he began his University studies in Dublin, and before long the name of Rev. D. Finn, S.J., began to head the lists of examination results. As a boy he had taken up modern languages - French, German and Italian - for no other reason than that the school which we both attended cultivated them particularly. At the University he took up classics, and it was classics that formed the basis of the wide culture that was afterwards his. His entrance into classical studies was almost sensational, for after six months study of Greek he won a scholarship and first place in Greek and Latin in the University entrance examination. First with first-class honours in every examination, and every scholarship within reach, would be a correct summing up of this university career.

Recording examination successes is a monotonous thing, and in the case of Father Finn the less said about examinations the better if a proper estimate of him is to be given. He hated examinations. The humdrum work which they demanded was nauseating to him, and it was fortunate that preparation for them demanded such little effort on his part. He was always at his best when off the beaten track. I remember once meeting him in a country place when he was resting after a bout of examinations. He had a geologist’s hammer in his hand and was off to a railway cutting to look for fossils. The byways of the classics soon interested him. He stopped his first reading of Homer to make a model of a trireme, and a very ingenious model it was, with the oars made to scale and of a much more reasonable length than some antiquarians suggested. A year later he had developed a new theory for completing the friezes of the Parthenon, and he beguiled a number of people into adopting statuesque poses and allowing themselves to be photographed to demonstrate his theory. I have a vivid recollection of the sheepish look of a village shoe-maker who found himself dressed in a trousers and a long red curtain, standing on one leg and holding his arms at unnatural angles. Whenever he seemed on the point of demanding a return to modern clothes and village dignity, Father Finn used tactfully to interject a remark about his splendid muscles, and so secure a continuance of the pose for another photograph.

On being awarded a Travelling Studentship from the University in Ireland, Father Finn went to Oxford, and from his time his classical studies were carried on more and more in museums rather than from books. His reading indeed was then as at all times, enormous, but he was by nature an explorer in unusual spheres and henceforth his reading was mainly a background for his explorations. In Oxford he devoted himself to the writing of a thesis on the colouring of Greek sculpture. It won him the highest praise, and one of the professors excused himself from the usual examination on the plea that the reading of the thesis showed that the writer know more about it than he did. When he returned to Ireland the first thing that he did was to look up the Greek professor in Dublin who had whetted his interest in archaeology and suggest to him that they should start some excavations on the hill of Tara.

A few years teaching classics in a secondary school followed. These were undistinguished years, for preparing boys for examinations was emphatically not Father Finn’s strong point. But he interested some of his cleverer pupils in all kinds of strange branches of study, and years later many men acknowledged their indebtedness to him for an interest in intellectual pursuits which they would otherwise never have had.

When it was time for him to go abroad to do further studies I received a letter from him. I was then in Italy and he wanted to know if it would be good for him to go to study in Rome, as was suggested. His idea was that an alternation of lectures in philosophy and visits to museums would be better than whole-time philosophical studies. But before my reply reached him it was decided that residence in a German-speaking house would be most useful for his future studies in the classics. So he was sent to Innsbruck, in the Tyrol. This decision, with which he was delighted, was to prove a fateful one for him.

In the December before the war broke out I was passing through Austria and met him in Innsbruck. I was bewildered by the number of new interests that engrossed him. Munich was near enough for an occasional visit to its museums and picture-galleries, but now the social movements in Germany and Austria had begun to attract him, and Austrian folk-lore was tugging at his attention too. He had always been a student of art, and his special leaning was towards Gothic architecture and Gothic sculpture, and he found time to give considerable time to it in Innsbruck. There was a problem here, too, to attract him, and I was not many hours in the town before he had me standing beside the Emperor Maximilan’s tomb while he expounded his theories about the identity of the famous figures surrounding it.

In the following summer the war broke out and Fr. Finn, from being among friends, became a stranger in a hostile land. Though the Austrians treated the alien residents with all that courtesy in which they excel, yet war is war and conditions were hard. At first things were not so bad, he was allowed to continue his studies, and all that was demanded was that he should report regularly to the police authorities. Then he had to do hospital work; then supplies began to run low - then his health gave out. The remaining years were difficult ones. An effort to get permission for him to leave the country did not succeed. But within the possibilities of wartime conditions he was treated with every consideration. He was moved from place to place, to countries that have since changed their names, and after some time in Lower Austria, in Hungary and in Czechoslovakia he was sent finally to Poland, where he could continue his studies. He was fond of Poland, and spoke more of it than of any of the other countries in which he lived. He learned the Polish language and a certain amount of Russian. It was in Poland that he was ordained to the priesthood.

After the war he returned to Ireland sadly broken in health. He had developed tuberculosis, and the only hope of saving his life was to go to a drier climate. He went to Australia and there he made a rapid recovery. To anyone who knew him in Hong Kong it would seem fantastic to suggest that he was a delicate man, but it is true that his health was never the same after the period of semi-starvation which he had gone through in the last years of the war, and it was only by adopting a special diet that he could keep going. The diet was not an attractive one, but he certainly kept going.

In Australia he became Prefect of Studies in Riverview College, near Sydney, and there as usual he continued his interest in all kinds of side issues. It was one of these latter that eventually brought him to the East. There were some Japanese pupils in this College, and in order to be able to help them in their studies Father Finn began to study Japanese - a language more or less never worried him. Inevitably he soon became interested in Japanese antiquities, and before long he was in communication with some fellow-Jesuits in Japan. There is a Jesuit University in Tokyo, directed by German Fathers, and when they found that a man of Father Finn’s standing was interested in things Japanese, they declared at once that the place for him was Tokyo, and they made demarches to get him there. After some negotiations everything was arranged, and he left Australia on a boat that was to bring him to Japan. That was in the beginning of 1927.

Then happened one of those things that people say happen only to Jesuits. When the ship was on the high seas and Father Finn was immersed in his Japanese studies, a wireless message came to him, telling him that he was not to go to Japan after all, but that he was to get off at Hong Kong and go no further. It had happened that between the time that arrangements were made for him to go to Tokyo and the end of the Australian school year, when it would be possible for him to start, it had been decided that some Irish Jesuits were to come to Hong Kong, and it was felt that this colony had first claim on the services of Father Finn. So, a little bewildered by the unexpected change that blew all his plans sky-high, Father Finn landed in Hong Kong in February, 1927. He was then forty-one years old.

It happened that during his years in Australia his position as Prefect of Studies in a large college had brought him a good deal into educational circles and aroused his interest in pedagogical matters. As interest for him found expression in deep study, he set to work to master the theory of education. In a few years whatever he had to say on matters connected with education was listened to with respect, and when he was leaving Sydney there was public expression of regret that New South Wales was losing a leading authority on education. Hong Kong at that time was looking for a substitute for Professor Forster, to take his place as Professor of Education in the University while he was on leave, and the result was that Father Finn was only a few days in the Colony when he was asked to take the position, So his connection with the Hong Kong University began.

Always a conscientious worker, Father Finn took the greatest care to do his work in the University in a way that was worthy of his position, and this was little short of heroic on his part, for, having come to China, his one desire was to go as deeply and as quickly as possible into the new field of antiquities that was open to him. He found time to begin the study of Chinese, however, but it was not until his temporary occupancy of the professorship was at an end that he was able to devote himself with all the intensity that he desired to his new studies. But he was not long free, and his next move was to Canton, where he taught, and later directed, the studies in the Sacred Heart College. Here his colleagues had an opportunity of seeing the way in which he worked, for, while most of his day was given to work in the classroom, he managed at the same time to give from five to seven hours each day to the study of Chinese. He made rapid strides in the language and, though he never acquired a good pronunciation, he learned to speak fluently Cantonese and some other local dialects and to read Chinese with such ease as is rarely acquired by a foreigner.

From that time forward Chinese antiquities occupied every moment that was free from his regular duties. When he spent some time in Shanghai, part of it was given to translating some of the Recherches sur les Superstitions en Chine, by P. Dore, S.J., and in whatever house he lived in Hong Kong his room soon took on the appearance of a museum. There was never any such thing as leisure time in his programme-study of one kind or another filled every available moment. He worked with great rapidity. He got to the “inside” of a book in a very short time, and every book that he read was a work of reference to him ever after, for at a moment’s notice he seemed to be able to trace any passage or any illustration in any book that he had read. In the few years that he had it was remarkable how much ground he covered in Chinese antiquities. On this subject his reading extended to practically every work of note in English, German and French, and to a considerable number of books also in Chinese and Japanese-for he had worked hard at Japanese when he realized that it was necessary for his antiquarian studies. His appointment as Lecturer in Geography in the Hong Kong University revealed another side of his interests, for it was only when his name came up in connection with the position that it was realized how fully abreast he was of modern methods of geographical study, and how detailed, in particular, was his knowledge of the geography of China.

His interest was gradually converging on archeological research in Hong Kong when an accidental circumstance threw him right into the midst of it. He was living in the Seminary at Aberdeen, and one morning, about five years ago, he crossed the creek in the early morning to go to say Mass in the Convent of the Canossian Sisters in the village. As he climbed up from the sampan he saw a pile of sand being unloaded from a junk by the shore. His eye caught a fragment of an arrow-head in the sand. He picked it out, put it in his pocket and went on. But on his return an hour later he stopped to examine the sand, and found that it came from an archeologist's gold mine, for within a short time he found several other interesting stone fragments and a few pieces of bronze. He questioned the men who were still engaged in unloading it, and found that it came from Lamma Island out in the bay. Further inquiries revealed that the work was being done under Government authority, and the sand was being removed rapidly by shiploads. To him this was vandalism and tragedy combined. He knew already from the work of Professor Shellshear and Mr. Schofield how important were the archeological remains to be found around Hong Kong, and how illuminating they might be in their relation to many of the unsolved problems of pre-history, and here he found valuable evidence of the past being used to build walls and make drains. He had to act at once if he was to do his part for science and Hong Kong, he got through preliminaries as quickly as possible and within a week he was excavating on Lamma Island.

The results exceeded all expectations. To the uninitiated the stones and bits of earthenware which he handled so reverently were a disappointing result after hours of digging in the glaring sun, but to him and to others that were able to read their message, they were keys to unlock new storehouses of knowledge of the past. He now began to communicate his discoveries to scholars in other lands, and their interest was manifest. The Government of Hong Kong was alive to the importance of this new field of research and it gave a grant towards the expense connected with it. Henceforth Father Finn’s big interest in life was the archeology of Hong Kong.

It would seem as if all his previous life was a preparation for these few years. Up to this time one might have said of him that he was taking too many things in his line of vision and that he would have done better if he had concentrated on some one branch of study. He had in him the capacity to do really great work in some one direction, but the multitude of his interests made him just a man of encyclopedic knowledge when he might have been a specialist of eminence. But now all the jigsaw elements of his previous studies seemed to fall together and to make the essential background for his work in an almost unexplored branch of science. His classical training, his long study of classical archeology, his scientific interests, his close study of history and geography, his knowledge of art-these were all essential to him now, but they could only be utilised because he possessed the archeologist's flair that made him know what to seek and how to interpret, and gave his work in this field the character of genius. He enlarged the field of knowledge in this particular branch of archeology, even though, as he claimed, his work in it had hardly begun. His numerous articles in the Hong Kong Naturalist, ably illustrated by his esteemed friend Dr. Herklots, and the collection of objects excavated by him are all that remain as a record of his work. What he might have done if he had been spared for a few years more we can only surmise. It is the possibility of great achievement that makes his death so tragic.

And what of the man behind the student and the scholar? I have told of him as a well-liked boy even though of a class rarely conspicuous for popularity. As a man, among his Jesuit associates and with his few other friends, he was known and will always be remembered for his delightful disposition and perennial good humour. I am sure that no one who ever came into contact with Father Finn ever found in him a trace of conceit. The mere suggestion of it is ludicrous to anyone who knew him, and when any were led by ignorance of his own particular field of research to be critical of its utility, he was never provoked-even in their absence-to anything more than a good-humored sally. His wide interests embraced the work of all his companions. He knew what interested each one, and he was genuinely interested in it too. In everything he was always ready to help those who wanted his assistance, and much as he deplored the loss of a moment of time, he gave it unstintingly when the need of another claimed it. His thoughtfulness and sympathetic kindness made him a friend of all who knew him, and it is those who were associated with him most closely that will miss him most.

When writing of a priest-scholar it is often thought enough to add a paragraph at the end stating that, of course, this scholar was also a priest, and that he was all that a priest should be. To do so in the case of Father Finn would leave the picture of him very incomplete. His life was essentially that of a priest and religious devoted to science and scholarship rather than that of a scholar who happened to wear a Roman collar. The principles that moulded his life were visible in his attitude towards every duty assigned him and every branch of his study. If at any time, for any reason, he had been told to drop whatever work he was doing and turn to something completely new, he would have done it without question at a moment’s notice. Everyone who knew him realized that. From the moment he came to China he regarded himself as a missionary. His work was to spread the knowledge of God’s Truth, and he was ready to do it in any way that came within his scope. He did it abundantly by his example alone, and the testimonies about him since his death show that this influence of his example extended over a far wider field that he would ever have imagined.

In June, 1936, he left Hong Kong to attend an Archeological Congress in Oslo. His report there on the work in Hong Kong attracted wide attention. Invitations poured in on him-to go to various centers of learning in Europe and America, to join in excavations in many lands. He was able to accept only a few, for he had already arranged to join in some research in the Malay Peninsula next spring. But he visited Sweden, Denmark and France, and then made a brief visit to his native Ireland. From there he went to London, to study in the British Museum. While in London he was attacked by some kind of blood poisoning-the result, he believed, of something he contracted in his archaeological work in Hong King, but who can tell? The doctors could not trace the source of the infection, but it proved fatal after a month’s illness.

When the news of his death came to Hong Kong it was felt as a personal sorrow by those whose sympathy he would have valued most. Poor boat-women on the sampans at Aberdeen wept when they were told it, and little children on Lamma Island were sad when they were told that he would not come back. It was the welcome of such as these that would have pleased him most if he returned; it is their regret at his death that most reveals to us his real worth. May he rest in peace.
The Irish Jesuit Directory and Year Book 1938

 

華南總修院范神父赴那威
出席國際考古大會

現 任 香 港 華 南 總 修 院 神 師 , 聖 教 歷 史 教 授 兼 香 港 大 學 地 理 教 授 之 范 神 父 , 近 年 來 對 於 考 古 學 甚 有 心 得 , 昨 承 上 峯 命 , 代 表 本 港 出 席 在 那 威 舉 行 之 國 際 第 二 屆 古 物 大 會 , 范 司 鐸 已 於 六 月 廿 八 日 德 輪 首 途 , 聞 於 明 年 春 間 返 院 復 職 云
1936 年 8 月 1 日

 

一代之考古學家
范達賢司鐸逝世
張之鹽

耶 穌 會 司 鐸 范 達 賢 碩 士 。 他 生 前 是 華 南 總 修 院 之 神 師 兼 教 授 , 及 香 港 大 學 的 教 授 , 且 是 現 代 世 界 著 名 的 一 位 考 古 學 家 。 那 麼 他 之 死 , 不 但 是 香 港 學 術 界 之 不 幸 。 而 且 是 世 界 學 術 上 的 一 大 損 失 ; 故 不 但 值 得 吾 人 的 追 悼 , 實 為 世 界 學 術 界 所 惋 惜 , 作 者 張 之 鹽 是 范 鐸 的 門 生 , 略 知 其 生 平 , 茲 特 為 介 紹 如 下 :

履歷
范 鐸 於 一 八 八 六 年 生 在 愛 爾 蘭 的 科 爾 克 城 。 少 年 時 , 品 學 兼 優 。 一 九 0 二 年 , 他 入 了 耶 穌 會 , 經 過 兩 年 初 學 訓 練 後 , 在 皇 立 大 學 研 究 古 文 , 得 了 碩 士 學 位 及 官 費 遊 學 之 優 異 。 他 於 是 往 德 國 從 事 研 究 德 國 之 文 化 …… 。 他 完 成 了 三 年 哲 學 後 , 受 命 往 哥 倫 高 斯 , 活 特 著 名 的 學 院 充 當 教 授 , 後 往 奧 國 , 在 因 斯 卜 勒 克 , 攻 讀 神 學 , 時 值 歐 戰 。 他 讀 完 神 哲 , 因 不 能 回 國 , 趁 此 機 會 在 波 蘭 , 捷 克 斯 拉 夫 及 其 他 文 化 中 心 之 地 點 。 努 力 研 究 此 數 國 的 文 學 , 得 到 相 當 的 成 功 。 當 他 在 澳 洲 曾 任 悉 尼 的 利 法 非 中 學 校 校 長 兼 教 務 主 任 , 也 有 很 大 的 貢 獻 。

大學教授
他 初 到 香 港 ── 一 九 二 七 至 二 八 年 間 , 即 為 香 港 大 學 教 授 , 代 替 科 斯 德 教 授 權 充 講 席 , 一 九 二 八 年 間 , 他 因 就 任 廣 州 聖 心 中 學 教 務 主 任 , 便 與 香 港 大 學 暫 且 脫 離 。 直 至 一 九 三 一 年 鴨 巴 甸 華 南 總 修 院 開 幕 , 他 回 港 在 修 院 服 務 , 始 再 應 聘 為 港 大 的 地 理 教 授 , 約 在 這 期 間 曾 由 英 文 譯 了 幾 本 考 究 中 國 邪 神 的 書 籍 , 在 土 山 灣 印 書 局 出 版 。

他 又 是 港 大 學 術 聯 合 會 的 會 員 , 關 於 聯 合 會 之 各 項 工 作 , 他 常 常 有 所 贊 助 及 貢 獻 。

考古
他 到 鴨 巴 甸 後 , 因 為 地 近 中 國 古 代 戌 守 的 所 在 , 他 就 起 首 繼 續 他 考 古 的 興 趣 , 積 極 地 在 舶 遼 洲 一 帶 , 發 掘 中 國 古 代 的 遺 物 。 他 曾 惹 起 香 港 政 府 的 注 意 , 致 使 政 府 出 諭 取 締 舶 遼 洲 一 帶 埋 有 古 物 的 地 方 , 遣 一 隊 動 員 去 採 掘 , 他 被 委 為 動 員 的 領 隊 。

計 他 自 己 發 掘 所 得 之 古 代 陶 器 , 石 刀 , 石 斧 及 銅 鑄 的 戈 矛 等 , 大 多 數 是 漢 朝 以 上 之 遺 物 , 極 有 研 究 之 價 值 , 現 在 一 半 陳 列 在 華 南 總 修 院 , 一 半 陳 列 在 香 港 利 瑪 竇 寄 宿 舍 。

一 九 三 五 年 , 他 曾 一 次 得 香 港 政 府 的 任 命 及 香 港 大 學 的 特 委 , 代 表 參 加 馬 尼 拉 的 科 學 大 會 。 今 年 七 月 , 他 再 作 香 港 政 府 及 大 學 的 代 表 出 席 挪 威 , 奧 斯 陸 京 城 的 世 界 古 物 大 會 。 在 會 議 間 , 『他 所 發 現 的 古 物 , 發 表 之 見 解 , 給 席 中 的 科 學 家 以 深 刻 的 印 象 和 認 識 。』 且 此 次 大 會 的 報 告 , 備 極 稱 道 他 考 古 的 成 績 。 (譯 自 香 港 日 報 Daily Press) 他 真 不 愧 為 現 代 著 名 的 一 位 考 古 學 家 了 !

奧 斯 陸 京 城 之 大 會 閉 幕 後 , 他 即 取 道 倫 敦 , 志 在 博 覽 倫 敦 博 物 院 中 之 考 古 書 籍 。 不 幸 , 約 十 月 十 日 抵 倫 敦 後 , 大 概 因 積 勞 而 成 疾 , 乃 於 一 九 三 六 年 十 一 月 一 日 逝 世 !

追悼
他 死 後 一 週 , 在 華 南 總 修 院 舉 行 安 所 彌 撒 大 禮 。 香 港 主 教 恩 理 覺 亦 蒞 臨 與 禮 。

香 港 大 學 學 術 聯 合 會 , 亦 於 十 一 月 三 日 開 會 追 悼 , 開 會 時 , 主 席 謂 : 「他 報 告 范 司 鐸 之 死 訊 , 並 謂 他 之 死 不 但 於 大 學 且 於 聯 合 會 是 一 大 損 失 。 且 為 世 界 學 術 界 之 一 大 損 失 也 云 云 。」 同 日 香 港 大 學 下 半 旗 一 天 以 示 哀 悼 。
1936 年 12 月 1 日

 

香港大學及華南修院員生
追悼范達賢司鐸

現 代 著 名 之 考 古 大 家 范 達 賢 司 鐸 忽 於 十 一 月 二 日 逝 世 , 噩 耗 傳 來 , 咸 為 惋 惜 。 至 於 范 鐸 之 生 平 及 其 對 於 學 術 貢 獻 , 已 詳 載 本 報 專 載 之 「一 代 之 考 古 學 大 家 范 達 賢 司 鐸 逝 世」 一 文 , 庸 無 多 贅 。 惟 查 香 港 大 學 及 華 南 總 修 院 學 生 均 屬 范 鐸 在 世 時 之 門 生 。 故 港 大 華 南 各 員 生 等 , 痛 導 師 之 遽 失 , 傷 巨 星 之 隕 落 。 除 已 在 各 該 校 開 追 悼 會 及 下 半 旗 誌 哀 外 , 並 特 於 本 月 廿 五 日 晨 在 堅 道 大 堂 舉 行 大 安 所 彌 撒 追 悼 , 及 有 耶 穌 會 神 父 演 講 。 是 時 全 堂 悲 痛 空 氣 , 頗 為 濃 厚 云
1936 年 12 月 1 日

 

華南總修院與考古家范神父
周若漁

當 人 們 踏 進 我 們 圖 書 室 時 , 最 先 映 入 他 們 的 眼 簾 的 , 要 算 那 三 個 櫃 子 裡 的 古 物 。 不 用 說 考 古 家 , 地 質 學 家 , 或 受 過 高 深 教 育 的 人 , 凡 是 來 院 參 觀 的 , 一 進 到 我 們 的 圖 書 室 , 他 們 莫 不 在 櫃 前 駐 足 一 會 兒 , 而 把 視 線 投 射 到 那 些 古 物 上 去 。 因 著 這 些 古 物 , 修 院 的 名 字 確 已 被 帶 到 很 遼 遠 的 地 方 去 了 。 現 在 在 修 院 裡 還 存 放 著 四 十 多 箱 未 經 整 理 的 古 物 , 已 整 理 的 大 部 份 存 放 在 利 瑪 竇 寄 宿 舍 , 其 餘 一 小 部 , 像 石 斧 , 石 刀 , 石 鎚 , 石 杵 , 石 箭 , 石 矛 , 石 球 , 石 環 , 玉 珥 及 一 些 原 古 石 器 ; 銅 箭 鏃 , 銅 矛 ; 及 各 式 的 泥 饔 , 陶 碟 , 陶 壼 , 陶 碗 …… 等 共 百 餘 件 , 存 於 華 南 總 修 院 , 以 資 觀 摩 。 這 古 物 的 發 見 與 出 土 的 經 過 , 曾 與 我 們 修 院 有 密 切 的 關 係 , 本 院 今 年 十 週 年 紀 念 , 適 為 這 位 發 掘 者 死 後 五 週 年 , 覩 物 思 人 , 無 限 感 觸 。

誰 都 知 到 , 華 南 總 修 院 裡 的 古 物 是 范 達 神 賢 神 父 Fr. D. Finn S.J. 發 掘 的 , 他 是 一 位 愛 爾 蘭 籍 的 耶 穌 會 士 , 于 一 九 二 七 年 二 月 來 華 , 自 華 南 總 修 院 落 成 後 , 他 是 首 批 來 院 者 之 一 , 在 修 院 擔 任 聖 教 歷 史 , 聖 教 演 講 學 , 及 神 師 等 職 , 同 時 兼 任 香 港 大 學 地 理 教 授 。 自 他 來 修 院 任 教 後 , 直 到 他 生 命 的 末 刻 。 未 嘗 卸 脫 本 院 的 職 務 。

說 到 他 在 香 港 考 古 的 動 機 , 事 情 很 是 巧 妙 , 他 每 天 早 晨 必 自 修 院 外 出 , 到 鴨 巴 甸 的 一 間 女 修 院 行 祭 , 這 間 小 堂 離 我 們 的 修 院 不 遠 。 某 天 清 早 , 他 循 例 渡 海 往 那 小 堂 行 祭 , 登 岸 時 , 他 看 見 一 艘 大 木 船 , 正 從 事 把 載 來 的 沙 搬 運 上 岸 。 他 行 經 沙 旁 , 偶 然 發 見 一 銅 矢 , 因 未 行 祭 , 不 願 分 心 , 便 隨 手 把 它 拾 起 , 放 進 衣 袋 裡 , 及 行 祭 完 畢 , 他 再 走 到 原 來 的 沙 堆 旁 觀 察 , 隨 又 發 見 了 其 他 幾 件 不 完 整 的 古 物 , 詢 問 之 後 , 才 知 此 沙 是 政 府 從 博 寮 島 Lamma Island 運 來 為 建 築 之 用 的 。 他 暗 嘆 這 寶 貴 的 古 物 , 給 人 這 樣 遺 棄 而 未 發 覺 , 同 時 他 曉 得 Prof. Shellshear 教 授 Mr. Schofied 先 生 怎 樣 關 懷 香 港 古 物 的 發 見 , 從 此 他 便 立 下 決 心 , 要 到 博 寮 島 發 掘 , 幾 天 後 , 他 便 乘 了 小 舟 到 博 寮 島 觀 察 。

自 此 以 後 , 他 一 面 在 修 院 擔 任 教 授 , 一 面 從 事 發 掘 工 作 。 說 到 他 的 發 掘 , 最 先 到 的 自 然 是 博 寮 島 。 他 最 初 發 掘 時 , 並 未 雇 大 批 的 工 人 , 也 沒 有 購 置 特 殊 的 發 掘 工 具 , 他 只 是 約 幾 位 本 院 的 修 士 一 二 工 人 荷 鏟 鋤 等 前 往 。 修 院 的 假 日 便 是 他 發 掘 的 佳 期 , 他 先 後 到 過 青 山 海 濱 一 帶 及 赤 柱 , 博 寮 島 是 他 前 往 的 次 數 最 多 , 因 為 那 裡 古 物 豐 富 , 距 離 又 不 很 遠 , 從 修 院 乘 帆 船 到 那 裡 不 過 一 小 時 。 他 在 本 港 附 近 工 作 , 除 了 一 次 在 大 嶼 山 逗 留 過 幾 天 外 , 平 常 都 是 朝 去 晚 回 的 。 修 院 的 東 麓 , 也 給 他 發 掘 過 , 據 說 也 獲 得 一 些 古 石 器 。 在 香 港 以 外 的 地 方 , 他 到 過 汕 尾 和 三 州 島 , 後 者 是 聖 方 濟 各 沙 勿 略 逝 世 的 地 方 , 在 那 裡 他 曾 獲 得 了 一 些 與 方 濟 各 同 時 的 遺 物 。 他 出 發 以 前 , 總 是 在 修 院 的 報 告 板 上 發 出 佈 告 , 誰 願 參 加 的 皆 可 報 名 , 所 以 當 時 這 裡 的 同 學 , 多 數 都 作 過 他 的 助 手 。 從 此 , 這 埋 藏 地 裡 的 華 南 古 物 , 便 一 批 批 的 與 他 們 的 血 汗 交 換 著 而 運 回 修 院 來 了 。

他 的 興 趣 與 收 獲 日 漸 豐 富 , 他 便 在 香 港 英 文 自 然 雜 誌 (H.K. Naturalist) 上 發 表 了 不 少 有 價 值 的 論 文 , 他 的 名 字 因 著 他 的 工 作 , 已 漸 給 人 認 識 與 注 意 , 而 修 院 因 著 他 的 古 物 也 吸 引 了 不 少 人 來 參 觀 , 國 內 知 名 之 士 , 如 許 地 山 , 陳 公 哲 等 也 曾 到 過 這 裡 。 香 港 政 府 對 他 的 發 掘 非 常 重 視 , 一 面 禁 止 別 人 再 到 博 寮 島 搬 運 沙 石 , 以 防 古 物 無 意 中 的 遺 失 及 遭 踐 踏 , 一 面 給 他 一 些 津 貼 , 並 發 掘 的 種 種 特 權 。 一 九 三 六 年 秋 間 挪 威 開 考 古 大 會 于 奧 斯 陸 Oslo。 他 被 香 港 政 府 聘 任 為 香 港 及 香 港 大 學 的 代 表 前 往 參 加 , 他 肩 負 著 這 些 使 命 , 並 帶 一 些 古 物 , 便 于 是 年 的 六 月 廿 八 日 , 離 開 我 們 的 修 院 放 洋 前 往 。 在 挪 威 他 的 演 講 , 博 得 了 不 少 的 聲 譽 , 那 時 筆 者 還 是 初 入 這 總 修 院 , 在 報 告 板 上 看 見 了 他 寄 回 來 挪 威 報 紙 上 刊 有 他 自 己 的 像 片 , 非 常 高 興 , 心 裡 想 等 他 回 來 後 , 一 定 跟 他 去 發 掘 古 物 。 他 在 照 片 上 的 態 度 , 是 一 手 握 著 一 個 泥 瓶 子 , 一 面 對 大 眾 演 講 。 大 會 閉 幕 後 , 在 歐 洲 和 美 洲 立 時 有 不 少 團 體 請 他 去 演 講 , 但 他 不 能 一 一 應 允 , 因 他 已 約 定 明 年 春 將 到 馬 來 西 亞 半 島 去 考 察 。 他 經 遊 瑞 典 , 丹 麥 , 法 國 , 轉 到 他 的 祖 國 愛 爾 蘭 , 隨 又 跑 到 倫 敦 , 大 英 博 物 館 裡 去 研 究 , 據 說 他 在 博 物 館 裡 , 自 晨 至 晚 , 只 吃 些 他 自 己 帶 備 的 兩 片 麵 包 及 一 些 奶 餅 充 飢 。 他 用 工 之 勤 , 由 此 可 想 一 斑 了 。 但 真 是 不 幸 , 不 知 為 了 什 麼 , 在 他 的 背 上 長 了 個 毒 瘡 , 毒 已 入 血 , 便 不 治 而 死 ! 是 日 適 為 諸 聖 瞻 禮 十 一 月 二 日 , 享 年 僅 五 十 歲 。 翌 日 我 們 修 院 便 接 到 電 報 , 傳 來 噩 耗 。 從 此 這 位 和 譪 可 親 能 操 英 , 德 , 法 , 義 , 希 , 拉 , 葡 , 波 蘭 , 中 , 日 等 語 言 的 博 學 士 便 永 遠 和 我 們 的 修 院 分 離 了 ! 他 不 但 是 我 們 修 院 , 他 的 本 會 , 或 香 港 的 一 個 損 失 , 也 是 全 世 界 考 古 界 的 一 個 大 損 失 !

范 神 父 來 院 的 經 過 , 也 值 得 追 述 。 他 先 在 愛 爾 蘭 患 了 肺 病 , 於 是 便 奉 命 到 澳 州 療 治 , 在 那 裡 他 很 迅 速 的 恢 復 了 他 的 健 康 , 便 留 在 Riverview College 當 監 學 , 那 學 校 的 學 生 有 不 少 日 本 人 , 他 便 跟 他 們 學 習 日 文 , 他 對 于 日 本 的 古 物 古 蹟 發 生 了 興 趣 , 不 久 他 被 請 到 東 京 一 座 耶 穌 會 士 管 理 的 學 校 當 教 授 , 船 已 啟 椗 , 但 他 在 半 途 忽 接 得 電 報 , 叫 他 不 要 往 日 本 , 轉 回 香 港 工 作 , 因 當 時 已 有 一 批 耶 穌 會 士 應 香 港 主 教 之 請 , 自 愛 爾 蘭 首 途 來 港 工 作 , 以 他 這 樣 能 幹 的 人 , 正 適 宜 于 幫 助 這 新 來 的 會 士 , 從 此 他 便 留 在 香 港 服 務 , 有 機 會 研 究 東 方 文 物 了 。 他 學 習 中 文 僅 三 載 , 他 對 于 廣 州 語 已 能 暢 所 欲 言 , 對 于 漢 文 的 各 種 書 籍 也 能 通 曉 。 以 後 他 再 研 究 篆 文 及 甲 骨 文 , 以 便 再 進 一 步 窺 探 中 國 古 籍 。

他 來 到 本 院 後 , 在 未 開 始 研 究 古 物 之 前 。 還 不 斷 地 學 習 中 文 , 自 開 始 考 古 後 , 他 一 部 份 的 時 間 自 不 能 不 被 研 究 古 物 所 佔 去 。 從 此 他 的 工 作 比 以 前 更 忙 , 但 他 從 未 因 為 私 人 的 研 究 而 影 響 他 所 教 授 的 功 課 , 所 以 他 為 預 備 日 間 的 功 課 , 有 時 工 作 到 深 夜 。 他 的 房 間 , 像 是 一 個 古 物 陳 例 所 , 泥 頭 , 磚 瓦 , 木 石 , 觸 目 皆 是 , 連 他 自 己 的 床 也 被 古 物 佔 去 。 同 學 中 凡 有 難 題 請 教 他 的 , 他 無 不 欣 然 接 納 , 給 人 解 釋 後 , 必 拿 起 一 些 古 物 來 向 人 講 述 , 歷 久 不 厭 。 他 既 是 修 院 的 神 師 , 所 以 凡 在 心 靈 上 有 向 他 求 助 者 , 他 無 不 以 慈 父 之 心 待 之 , 煩 憂 者 安 慰 之 , 疑 難 者 解 釋 之 , 常 現 出 一 副 慈 祥 的 面 孔 , 又 好 言 笑 , 樂 與 人 言 談 。 我 們 修 院 , 每 年 于 聖 誕 之 夜 , 神 長 師 友 必 集 于 聖 誕 樹 前 唱 歌 作 樂 , 以 盡 其 歡 , 平 常 飾 演 聖 誕 老 人 的 都 是 院 中 的 一 位 同 學 , 但 有 一 回 , 范 神 父 竟 親 自 飾 演 起 聖 誕 老 人 來 , 從 電 燈 息 滅 的 一 剎 那 , 他 便 溜 進 福 堂 中 來 , 言 語 幽 默 , 動 作 滑 稽 , 滿 座 的 人 莫 不 為 之 捧 腹 。

從 上 述 的 種 種 看 來 , 可 知 他 聰 明 絕 頂 , 學 問 淵 博 , 待 人 接 物 , 謙 和 可 親 , 總 之 , 他 是 我 們 修 院 不 可 多 得 的 一 位 良 師 , 但 很 可 惜 , 他 離 開 我 們 這 麼 早 。 現 在 華 南 總 修 院 慶 祝 十 週 年 紀 念 , 我 想 他 在 天 的 英 靈 , 必 祝 福 本 院 昌 盛 與 平 安 吧
1941 年 12 月 1 日

 

香港史前遺物發現人
范達賢神父小傳
程野聲譯

我 現 在 試 寫 這 篇 短 文 , 為 紀 念 一 位 博 學 之 士 , 著 名 科 學 家 , 公 教 的 賢 者 , 我 已 亡 的 朋 友 范 達 賢 神 父 (Fr. D. Finn S.J.) , 短 短 的 紀 述 , 這 未 免 有 些 遺 漏 而 失 詳 。 近 年 認 識 范 神 父 的 賴 怡 恩 神 父 (Fr. T. Ryan S.J) , 他 寫 了 范 神 父 的 傳 和 工 作 在 十 月 號 (一 九 三 六 年) 的 盤 石 雜 誌 (The Rock) 上 發 表 , 既 然 這 本 雜 誌 是 大 眾 的 讀 物 , 我 便 徵 得 賴 神 父 的 同 意 , 綜 合 他 發 表 過 的 觀 點 , 再 給 讀 者 介 紹 。

范 神 父 在 可 克 (Cork) 學 生 代 已 是 頂 角 崢 嶸 , 他 在 愛 爾 蘭 會 考 中 , 常 各 列 前 茅 , 獲 得 一 金 質 的 紀 念 章 ; 他 的 成 功 是 不 可 想 像 的 ; 概 括 說 來 他 每 次 列 席 考 試 , 名 必 列 首 位 。 在 學 校 裡 專 攻 現 在 語 言 : 法 蘭 西 語 , 德 意 志 語 和 意 大 利 語 , 但 在 都 柏 林 國 立 大 學 攻 讀 的 是 古 典 文 學 , 他 讀 了 六 個 月 希 臘 文 , 便 在 考 大 學 入 學 考 試 中 , 獲 得 獎 學 金 與 拉 丁 和 希 臘 文 的 魁 首 。 在 每 次 考 試 中 , 他 總 是 佔 第 一 名 而 得 到 優 等 的 榮 譽 , 並 在 他 攻 讀 範 圍 內 的 一 總 科 目 , 他 都 獲 到 獎 學 金 。 對 於 古 典 文 學 很 早 就 引 起 他 的 興 趣 。 他 曾 放 棄 過 他 首 次 研 究 的 荷 馬 詩 文 , 以 想 做 成 一 個 三 層 獎 的 古 代 戰 船 的 模 型 , 作 這 種 模 型 須 要 絕 頂 聰 明 的 : 它 的 長 度 要 合 乎 標 準 , 它 的 長 度 又 要 適 合 , 這 種 思 量 真 是 不 亞 于 昔 日 的 老 水 手 們 所 提 議 。 一 年 後 他 發 明 一 種 新 理 論 來 完 成 伯 坦 族 人 (Parthenon) 阿 富 汗 北 部 的 花 托 柱 子 的 方 石 。 他 得 自 愛 爾 蘭 大 學 獎 給 的 學 生 旅 行 船 票 , 便 在 牛 津 , 並 在 此 時 攻 讀 古 典 文 學 的 成 就 , 是 在 博 物 院 裡 , 比 較 從 書 本 上 所 得 的 為 多 。 他 在 牛 津 曾 寫 過 一 篇 論 文 , 是 關 於 希 臘 彫 刻 的 色 彩 。 他 由 於 這 篇 論 文 而 博 得 極 熱 烈 的 讚 賞 , 教 授 中 的 一 位 還 請 免 他 提 出 考 問 之 問 題 , 因 為 他 看 了 這 篇 論 文 , 覺 得 這 論 文 的 作 者 (范 神 父) 比 自 己 所 識 的 還 多 。

大 戰 爆 發 前 不 久 , 他 往 晉 斯 蒲 路 克 (Inshruek) 在 提 羅 爾 (Tyrol) 續 攻 讀 古 典 文 學 , 並 在 這 裡 和 在 慕 尼 克 博 物 院 研 究 。

藝 術 , 哥 德 式 建 築 , 歌 德 式 彫 刻 術 , 民 間 風 俗 和 社 會 學 都 是 他 主 要 研 究 的 目 標 , 大 戰 爆 發 後 , 因 他 是 一 個 外 國 人 , 便 居 留 奧 地 利 , 當 初 他 精 銳 地 繼 續 他 的 研 究 , 但 後 來 他 健 康 消 失 了 , 便 離 開 這 裡 而 逐 地 遷 徙 , 到 了 奧 地 利 , 匈 牙 利 , 即 現 在 的 捷 克 地 方 , 最 後 又 到 了 波 蘭 。 他 在 這 裡 學 習 語 言 , 他 很 喜 歡 居 住 波 蘭 , 並 學 說 波 蘭 話 , 也 規 定 一 些 時 間 來 學 習 俄 羅 斯 文 , 同 時 他 在 波 蘭 晉 陞 司 鐸 。

歇 戰 後 范 神 父 回 到 愛 爾 蘭 , 他 的 肺 病 那 時 愈 為 暴 露 , 惟 有 希 望 往 氣 候 乾 燥 的 地 方 以 療 養 , 他 即 往 澳 洲 , 在 這 裡 他 的 健 康 迅 速 地 恢 復 了 , 他 在 雪 梨 的 (Riverview) 中 學 , 和 不 少 的 日 本 人 接 觸 , 同 時 任 這 中 學 的 教 務 長 , 並 從 此 開 始 研 究 日 本 文 。 東 京 的 耶 穌 會 大 學 , 聽 說 范 神 父 精 日 本 文 , 便 請 他 往 那 裡 去 ; 一 切 預 備 好 了 , 他 便 著 手 , 要 往 日 本 , 然 而 , 為 著 香 港 , 他 的 計 劃 遂 改 變 了 , 並 於 一 九 二 七 年 二 月 到 了 香 港 , 時 年 四 十 一 歲 。

到 了 香 港 後 , 他 即 任 香 港 大 學 教 育 系 代 理 教 授 , 因 彼 時 Forster 教 授 適 出 缺 。

數 年 後 他 又 在 香 港 大 學 教 地 理 學 , 這 科 是 他 所 擅 長 的 。

在 一 個 時 期 內 他 任 廣 州 聖 心 中 學 的 教 務 長 , 在 此 , 他 除 極 其 用 功 的 研 究 和 教 授 外 , 還 每 天 以 六 七 小 時 來 學 習 中 國 語 , 每 天 工 作 到 夜 靜 更 深 , 習 以 為 常 。 他 學 習 廣 州 話 和 最 少 另 一 種 方 言 , 他 說 的 一 口 流 利 的 中 國 話 , 這 對 於 一 個 外 人 , 真 是 極 難 能 可 貴 。 他 對 於 現 代 的 象 形 文 字 , 頗 不 滿 意 , 而 研 究 它 的 源 流 和 變 化 , 在 雜 誌 上 發 表 了 他 的 兩 篇 處 女 作 的 短 篇 論 文 , 這 是 他 研 究 的 結 果 。 (「論 蒙 古 利 亞 人 種 的 眼」 (The Mongolian Eye) (自 然 界 雜 誌 第 三 卷) ; 「論 紀 元 前 二 千 年 中 國 人 身 體 上 的 幾 種 特 點 , (同 上 雜 誌 同 卷)

范 神 父 非 常 豐 富 的 學 問 , 包 括 多 種 歐 洲 的 語 文 : 拉 丁 文 希 臘 文 古 典 文 學 中 國 文 日 本 文 語 言 等 , 地 理 學 歷 史 學 教 育 , 具 有 這 理 想 的 根 底 , 他 更 研 究 中 國 的 考 古 學 , 他 在 生 命 最 後 的 幾 年 裡 , 用 盡 了 所 有 的 時 間 , 對 這 目 標 來 研 究 。

他 寫 了 十 三 篇 論 文 , 在 這 雜 誌 上 (香 港 自 然 界 雜 誌) 發 表 , 當 一 開 始 發 表 第 一 篇 論 文 (上 述 雜 誌 第 三 卷 第 二 二 六 頁) 便 掀 動 了 世 人 注 意 香 港 的 古 物 , 這 真 是 事 關 重 大 的 事 。

一 九 三 六 年 六 月 , 范 神 父 離 開 香 港 , 代 表 香 港 政 府 和 香 港 大 學 去 參 加 奧 斯 陸 的 世 界 考 古 學 大 會 。 在 此 他 引 起 了 世 界 考 古 學 家 們 對 於 香 港 古 物 密 切 的 注 意 , 並 被 邀 參 加 往 歐 洲 和 美 洲 各 地 發 掘 地 洞 。 他 去 過 瑞 典 丹 麥 和 法 國 考 察 , 又 往 愛 爾 蘭 , 並 從 愛 爾 蘭 往 倫 敦 , 到 不 列 顛 博 物 院 研 究 , 當 在 倫 敦 之 時 他 患 了 一 種 毒 汁 的 傳 染 病 , 他 相 信 這 病 是 在 香 港 考 古 時 所 招 致 的 , 但 , 誰 能 相 信 到 醫 生 們 都 查 不 出 傳 染 這 病 的 原 因 , 這 種 病 發 了 一 個 月 後 , 足 以 致 死 的 。

他 在 十 月 一 日 從 都 柏 林 給 我 最 後 的 一 封 信 上 這 樣 寫 著 : 「我 正 完 成 對 舶 遼 洲 (譯 者 按 : 香 港 附 近 的 一 島)」 古 物 的 第 十 三 篇 文 (最 後 的 一 篇) , 這 是 我 的 計 劃 , 這 使 你 感 覺 興 趣 的 ; 我 將 在 倫 敦 過 完 這 個 十 月 , 十 一 月 中 才 返 那 裡 。 十 二 月 初 , 便 動 身 , 經 巴 黎 , 科 倫 (Cologne) 維 也 納 , 一 月 四 日 上 船 ! 我 希 望 廿 五 日 左 右 , 便 抵 達 香 港 , 並 即 刻 往 安 南 和 馬 來 , 三 月 中 再 返 香 港 。 而 我 所 以 引 這 信 中 的 一 段 , 因 為 在 他 最 後 的 一 篇 論 文 , 在 這 雜 誌 發 表 了 , 而 引 起 我 對 他 的 結 局 , 發 生 一 種 奇 異 的 感 覺 。 但 范 神 父 繼 續 他 研 究 考 古 工 作 的 精 細 的 打 算 , 已 露 出 來 了 。 無 疑 的 , 這 意 願 只 有 從 他 的 信 上 證 明 。

十 一 月 廿 六 日 , 本 港 堅 道 主 教 座 堂 舉 行 亡 者 彌 撒 以 紀 念 范 神 父 。 舶 遼 洲 的 隱 秘 給 他 的 努 力 尋 出 了 , 現 在 他 (在 天 之 靈) 已 明 白 科 學 的 世 界 , 並 沒 有 什 麼 隱 秘 。

譯 者 附 言 : 這 篇 傳 的 作 者 , 是 香 港 大 學 出 版 的 「自 然 科 學 界 雜 誌」 (Hong Kong Naturalist) 的 主 筆 G.A. C. Herkloto 氏 , 刊 於 該 雜 誌 第 八 卷 第 四 號 。

又 范 神 父 在 香 港 附 近 之 舶 遼 洲 島 上 所 掘 得 之 古 物 , 計 有 石 器 : 石 斧 、 石 刀 、 石 鎜 、 石 戈 、 石 鎚 、 石 劍 等 ; 陶 器 : 缶 、 杯 、 碗 、 碟 、 罇 、 缸 、 罎 、 瓶 , 夜 壺 等 , 銅 器 : 箭 鏃 、 槍 頭 、 劍 、 壼 、 矛 、 戈 等 。 其 種 類 、 質 料 、 形 式 、 顏 色 等 則 詳 見 范 神 父 在 香 港 「自 然 科 學 界 雜 誌 發 表 的 十 三 篇 論 文, 總 題 為 Archeological Finds on Lamma Island near Hong Kong。 其 餘 發 表 於 香 港 英 文 盤 石 雜 誌 者 , 亦 得 十 餘 篇 , 皆 屬 不 朽 之 作 。
1947 年 2 月 23 日

 

十五年了
紀念范神父
斯望

又 逢 一 年 一 度 的 諸 聖 日 , 是 教 會 裡 一 個 可 喜 的 日 子 。 又 十 五 年 了 , 我 們 今 日 可 不 復 見 到 十 五 年 前 的 寮 博 洲 , 榕 樹 灣 的 古 物 發 掘 。 現 在 , 那 所 在 已 是 「軍 事 區」 , 不 是 學 者 們 用 力 的 時 候 。 十 五 年 的 未 來 , 是 多 麼 長 的 , 十 五 年 的 過 去 , 又 卻 一 剎 那 吧 !

發 掘 寮 博 洲 古 物 的 耶 穌 會 士 范 達 賢 司 鐸 (「廣 東 文 物」載 為 芬 神 父) 離 開 我 們 正 是 十 五 年 。 一 個 人 死 了 便 成 陳 舊 , 尚 有 何 說 ? 可 是 曾 經 受 過 范 司 鐸 教 育 過 的 都 不 會 輕 易 忘 記 。 不 因 他 學 識 潛 沉 , 淵 博 出 眾 , 而 是 他 誨 人 不 倦 , 教 人 不 厭 , 忠 於 所 信 , 篤 於 所 學 的 誠 懇 。 受 過 他 溫 風 濕 潤 的 人 都 中 年 了 , 我 們 今 日 更 了 解 , 更 認 識 一 個 良 好 的 師 表 , 他 真 是 何 等 樣 的 一 個 「人」 ! 今 天 是 諸 聖 日 , 明 天 便 諸 靈 。 讓 我 們 通 功 共 禱 吧
1950 年 11 月 15 日

 

重拾香港歷史─耶穌會芬神父考古事蹟
區美蓮整理

香港博物館早前在專題展覽館中展出「香港文物縱覽」,其中考古一部分所展出的文物,正是愛爾蘭耶穌會神父芬戴 禮 (Danie J. Finn) 在南丫島發掘的成果。原來這位神父是香港早期考古工作的重要人物之一 。

香 港 開 埠 以 前 , 一 直 被 西 方 視 為 荒 蕪 之 地 (a barren rock) , 卻 原 來 早 在 新 石 器 時 代 中 晚 期 , 便 有 人 類 居 住 在 這 裡 近 海 的 一 帶 。 這 些 發 現 全 賴 一 班 熱 心 的 業 餘 考 古 人 員 , 其 中 芬 神 父 在 南 丫 島 的 大 灣 , 更 展 開 了 香 港 歷 來 首 個 搶 救 出 土 文 物 的 工 作 , 這 熱 誠 亦 感 染 了 其 他 人 士 , 在 泥 土 與 碎 礫 中 重 塑 香 港 的 歷 史 。

早 於 一 九 二 六 年 , 業 餘 的 考 古 人 士 在 屯 門 發 現 了 古 代 的 石 器 後 , 引 起 了 不 少 人 的 興 趣 。 熱 愛 考 古 、 在 香 港 大 學 任 教 地 理 的 芬 神 父 一 九 三 二 年 , 更 得 到 早 期 在 香 港 開 展 考 古 工 作 的 香 港 大 學 解 剖 學 系 教 授 蕭 思 雅 (J. L. Shellshear) 邀 請 , 參 與 更 多 的 戶 外 發 掘 。 他 還 未 決 定 的 時 侯 , 奇 妙 的 事 情 發 生 了 。

芬 神 父 說 : 「當 我 還 認 為 積 極 參 與 發 掘 工 作 是 遙 遠 的 事 時 , 幸 運 的 事 似 乎 肯 定 了 這 個 職 志 。」 就 在 蕭 教 授 邀 請 他 的 後 幾 天 , 芬 神 父 在 香 港 仔 華 南 總 修 院 旁 (他 是 總 修 院 的 神 師 , 也 是 教 會 史 教 授  的 一 個 以 沙 堆 成 的 防 波 堤 上 , 幾 乎 踏 碎 了 一 塊 史 前 的 陶 器 碎 片 。 芬 神 父 第 二 天 再 到 該 處 , 又 發 現 一 塊 青 銅 片 、 一 個 石 予 頭 , 和 一 些 刻 有 特 別 圖 案 的 陶 器 碎 片 , 這 怎 能 不 勾 起 他 的 考 古 熱 情 ?

後 來 芬 神 父 得 悉 防 波 堤 的 沙 是 來 自 南 丫 島 (當 時 神 父 稱 之 為 「舶 遼 洲 」  榕 樹 灣 附 近 一 個 名 為 「大 灣」 的 沙 灘 , 他 便 幾 度 前 往 大 灣 。 在 那 裡 , 他 看 到 文 物 的 損 毀 : 有 一 次 , 他 看 見 一 名 婦 女 在 沙 灘 工 作 時 , 於 沙 中 拾 到 一 件 軟 陶 壺 , 隨 手 便 把 它 拋 在 地 上 , 珍 貴 的 文 物 便 成 了 碎 片 , 芬 神 父 要 阻 止 也 來 不 及 。

此 後 不 久 , 芬 神 父 便 著 手 籌 組 搶 救 文 物 行 動 。 到 一 九 三 三 年 , 芬 神 父 得 到 香 港 政 府 資 助 , 在 南 丫 島 一 帶 進 行 頗 具 規 模 的 發 掘 。 這 次 努 力 起 出 了 大 批 文 物 , 部 分 仍 保 留 在 香 港 歷 史 博 物 館 , 一 部 分 精 美 的 青 銅 器 和 陶 器 , 則 被 送 到 倫 敦 的 大 英 博 物 館 。

儘 管 這 次 發 掘 工 作 所 採 用 的 方 法 十 分 簡 單 , 它 卻 是 本 地 首 次 在 考 古 地 點 進 行 的 拯 救 文 物 行 動 , 可 算 是 香 港 考 古 工 作 的 一 個 里 程 碑 ; 發 掘 成 果 亦 十 分 豐 富 , 起 出 了 一 些 石 製 的 工 具 , 青 銅 的 武 器 和 陶 器 。 就 是 從 南 丫 島 大 灣 出 土 的 史 前 文 物 , 學 者 推 斷 出 早 在 新 石 器 時 代 中 期 (距 今 約 四 千 年) , 已 有 人 在 香 港 這 土 地 上 居 住 。

在 出 土 文 物 中 , 芬 神 父 發 現 香 港 的 青 銅 器 文 化 的 特 徵 是 , 印 有 款 式 多 樣 的 盤 曲 花 紋 (或 稱 為 夔 紋 , 英 文 稱 為 「double F) 的 硬 陶 器 。 從 大 灣 出 土 的 文 物 中 , 芬 神 父 推 測 , 大 灣 可 能 是 在 公 元 前 一 二 0 年 至 公 元 前 一 一 一 年 時 西 漢 大 舉 入 侵 南 越 時 的 其 一 戰 場 。 此 外 , 大 灣 出 土 的 青 銅 器 文 化 , 其 特 徵 與 殷 周 時 期 青 銅 器 的 夔 紋 十 分 相 似 。 可 見 香 港 過 去 雖 被 稱 為 南 蠻 文 化 , 事 實 上 早 年 的 南 方 文 化 已 開 始 與 北 方 文 化 融 和 。

芬 神 父 綜 合 其 考 古 成 果 , 撰 寫 論 文 談 論 大 灣 居 民 的 起 源 及 其 文 化 , 並 在 學 刊 內 發 表 。 芬 神 父 遂 漸 確 立 他 在 考 古 工 作 的 地 位 , 並 先 後 代 表 香 港 政 府 和 大 學 出 席 國 際 性 學 術 會 議 , 他 在 華 南 地 區 考 古 的 聲 明 亦 傳 至 歐 洲 。

雖 然 芬 神 父 的 研 究 結 果 都 變 得 過 時 , 考 古 報 告 亦 反 映 出 他 採 用 的 發 掘 方 法 有 錯 誤 , 但 這 絕 不 影 響 他 對 香 港 考 古 學 的 貢 獻 : 既 留 下 了 大 量 早 前 的 考 古 文 獻 , 亦 帶 動 了 考 古 的 研 究 。 首 位 在 香 港 從 事 考 古 工 作 的 華 人 陳 公 哲 先 生 , 便 承 認 受 芬 神 父 影 響 , 挑 起 了 他 對 考 古 工 作 的 興 趣 。 他 在 《香 港 考 古 發 掘 及 考 古 學 家》 一 文 敘 述 : 「讀 書 之 暇 …… 因 知 有 芬 神 父 之 考 古 事 。 再 覓 香 港 自 然 雜 誌 所 載 芬 神 父 之 《香 港 考 古 發 現》 , 更 知 其 詳 , 乃 租 艇 往 南 丫 島 , 探 求 芬 神 父 所 發 掘 之 海 灘 故 址 , 檢 得 陶 片 數 件 而 歸 , 心 尤 未 足 , 組 隊 再 往 , 實 行 試 探」 。 芬 神 父 對 香 港 文 化 的 貢 獻 可 見 一 斑 。

芬神父與夔紋
芬 戴 禮 神 父 一 八 八 六 年 生 於 愛 爾 蘭 , 精 於 多 國 語 言 , 初 中 時 期 便 曾 在 法 文 、 德 文 、 意 大 利 幾 種 語 文 的 作 文 比 賽 中 贏 得 第 一 名 。 他 於 一 九 0 二 年 成 為 耶 穌 會 初 學 生 , 兩 年 後 入 讀 都 柏 林 大 學 修 讀 考 古 , 並 於 一 九 0 九 年 在 牛 津 大 學 深 造 考 古 學 文 憑 , 可 見 這 位 傳 教 士 早 醉 心 於 考 古 工 作 。

在 奧 地 利 研 習 神 哲 學 的 芬 神 父 於 一 九 一 九 年 晉 鐸 , 於 一 九 二 六 年 抵 達 香 港 , 曾 往 澳 洲 和 西 班 牙 服 務 。 抵 港 後 一 年 , 他 前 往 廣 州 從 事 教 育 工 作 , 期 間 亦 修 讀 了 中 國 的 考 古 學 , 及 至 一 九 三 一 年 局 勢 變 得 不 明 朗 , 為 了 安 全 他 從 廣 州 返  回 香 港 , 在 香 港 仔 華 南 總 修 院 (即 香 港 仔 聖 神 修 院 的 前 身) 出 任 神 師 和 教 會 史 教 授 , 同 時 在 香 港 大 學 地 理 系 任 教 授 。

一 九 三 六 年 , 芬 神 父 往 倫 敦 大 英 博 物 館 研 究 他 從 香 港 帶 來 的 文 物 , 旋 不 久 卻 患 病 離 世 , 對 耶 穌 會 和 香 港 天 主 教 會 來 說 , 這 無 疑 是 一 個 噩 耗 。

芬 神 父 對 香 港 考 古 貢 獻 良 多 , 其 一 是 他 在 香 港 發 現 的 陶 器 花 紋 「夔 紋」  (double F) , 這 圖 案 像 兩 個 F 背 靠 背 , 其 一 倒 轉 。 有 趣 的 是 , 雙 「F」 正 好 是 芬 神 父 的 英 文 簡 稱 「Father Finn」 , 這 也 好 是 一 個 紀 念 。
2001 年 2 月 4 日


From Milan to Hong Kong 150 Years of Mission, by Gianni Criveller, Vox Amica Press, 2008.
從米蘭到香港150年傳教使命, 柯毅霖著, 良友之聲出版社, 2008.

先賢錄--香港天主教神職及男女修會會士 (1841-2010), 天主教香港教區檔案處, 2010.
先賢錄--香港天主教神職及男女修會會士 (1841-2016), 天主教香港教區檔案處, 2016.
一九二六年至二零一六年在香港的耶穌會會士影像回憶, 紀歷有限公司, 2016.